* CONCEPT in direct.vtheatre.net

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2008 ...

and Hamlet3.0


Hamlet2001 *
* 2007 updates 2008

"all moral crimes are first of all crimes against God and only secondarily against man"

Sensual Crimes

To make it simple, we have to have the mythology level. For example, Ghost and Hamlet = Father and Son (the Biblical love). Everything elae is secondary for dead king Hamlet. He calls, like all the dead, for the living to be with him. Death wish? "Not to be" is to be with his father! "Remember me" -- the only hope for the dead. Hamlet's anger -- they all forgot already! That is what' wrong with live, not the mortality...

Go to Hamlet2002 webEvent and become a part of the show!

GodotUAF

Theatre UAF Spring 2008

Man
R/G are Dead'08

picasa album : rg08

shakespeare

2007 images

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HamletDreams Ideas

Stoppard'08 Files : directing class

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faces
R/G are Dead'08

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pomo
R/G are Dead'08 ?

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There are big questions and the little ones, like -- Horatio orders the ghost to speak, and it disappears (line 59). Why? How to project it? And so on. The big problems demand different methods to deal with them. First, the POMO approach.

One of the principles of the postmodern metality is that we do not reflect on the first nature directly anymore, but through the second nature (humanity in intellectual technologies (like "Hamlet") and in high-technologies (like book or webcast)... What does it mean? In short, the difference between me and Shakespeare is that I have to reflect on the nature of man through reflections on Shakespeare's world! It is a fundamental law in arts, but nowadays it became mondatory. Acoording to POMO philosophy, I cannot reflect "directly" even on my own life experience without including the past "software" that shaped my identity. ["Hamlet" is a part of our "second" (man-made) nature with more lesser presence that the law of gravity in the first nature). Today an artist can't paint the landscape without going through the modem of the previous artistic styles. (There are plenty of postmodern thinkers who wrote about this phenomena in greater details, my goal is simply to give a frame of reference to our HamletDreams production).

The ideas (topics, issues) are the same as in the past: death, love, liife... but the approach is different.

From: "Anatoly Antohin"
Date: Wed Oct 10, 2001 5:48 pm
Subject: Character & Role

I thought that maybe I should restate what I said on Sun about Method Acting and Epic Theatre.
Although we do the "character exploration" accoding to Stanislavsky, we do not stage "Hamlet" as the whole play, only the episodes each character needs for the trial at the end when all of them join the world of the Ghost. Maybe this is a postmodern technique, but we will "cast" the audience next week as a chorus (Maureen is the leader of the chorus and all computer messages during the show will go through her laptop before getting to the screen).
I do ask everybody who is dead at the end to to re-establish the relations in the "other" world. Especially, when Shakespeare left it to our interpretation. The roles, no less the characters, will shape the "composition" of the show. Stading the pay in a linear fashion (from Act 1 to Act 5) perhaps doesn't ask did Ophelia's mother died giving birth to her and why Polonius didn't remarry -- in our case of hyber-text the public (the trial) could ask it. So, the Method asks for total identification with the character in order for you to step out and make the judgement over your character (Epic Theatre -- the macro-format of the show).
I will write more on the two women (Ophelia and the Queen) and the love stories later, but your love stories with your characters are a must, you have to defend them at the times of the Last Judgement.
Anatoly

NYC6-Title

Summary

Halet is too busy to love Ophelia, he has to choose between living in one world or another.

Questions

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Notes

What is missing -- the present, we, Americans, who think that we in control of our lives... until one day.

Shakespeare

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