* 2007
Project Utopia [2009]

Reckless * Reckless @ Amazon * vtheatre.net *

TOPICS: drama + comedy + postmodern + time + space + resurrection + 600 Files: wrong subjects, bad theories
2008 --

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ShowCases: 3 Sisters, Mikado, 12th Night, Hamlet, The Importance of Being Earnest, Dangerous Liaisons, Don Juan
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PS

anatoly.vtheatre.net/dramaturg
I keep the pix to remind myself that the story of Reckless is not over...

[ This is a small ARCHIVE directory or/and my directing portfolio ]

NYC6-Title
I might use "Reckless" pages for Film600 directory *

PS

Post-show thoughts and feelings are no less important than the shows itself!

I hope that somehow I will find the time to restore my notes. Wishful thinking, of course.

	Characters (SEVEN ACTORS?):

RACHEL
TOM
LLYOD
POOTY
ROY
TRISH
FIRST DOCTOR
TIM TIMKO
SECOND DOCTOR
THIRD DOCTOR
FOURTH DOCTOR
FIRST DERELICT
SECOND DERELICT
SIX DOCTOR
TALK SHOW HOST
DR. HELEN CARROLL
MAN IN SKI MASK
WOMAN PATIENT
RECEPTIONIST
TOM JUNIOR
VOICES OF VARIOUS ANNOUNCERS AND NEWSCASTERS

Film crew: camera man, director, assistant, makeup artist, hands.
ACT ONE. "THE SHOOTING SCRIPT"

Prologue. Pre-show.

Scene 1.
Tom and Rachel in their bedroom. TV and Christmas choir.
Announcers (starts in Prologue).
Contract on her life? Why? (First challenge to our logic.) Over the BG songs of love.

Scene 2. Pay phone. Lloyd.

Scene 3. In the car. Rachel and Lloyd.

Scene 4. Living room. Lloyd, Rachel, Pooty.

Scene 5. Phone to Jeanette (bus station). Left her boys?

Scene 6. Living room. Lloyd, Rachel, Pooty.

Scene 7. The office. Roy, Rachel. Trish.

Scene 8. Living room. Llyod, Rachel, Pooty (speaks).

Scene 9. Doctor's office.

Scene 10. The office. Trish, Rachel, Llyod.

Scene 11. TV studio. Tim. Crowd. Announcer. Rachel, Llyod, Pooty.

Scene 12. The office. Trish, Rachel.

Scene 13. Doctor's office.

Scene 14. Living room. Llyod and Pooty are dressed as Santa and a reindeer. Tom. Stuffed puppy. Broken glass. Poison champagne. Tom and Pooty die.

Scene 15. The car. Rachel drives. Llyod in his Santa suit. Running away.

(Intermission.)

ACT TWO. "THE MOVIE"

Scene 16. Night, snow. Rachel is still driving.

Scene 17. Hotel room. Lloyd, Rachel.

Scene 18. Doctor's office.

Scene 19. Hotel room. Llyod, Rachel.

Scene 20. Doctor's office.

Scene 21. Another hotel room. Llyod (drinking?), Rachel.

Scene 22. Doctor.

Scene 23. Another doctor's office and another hotel room. Llyod, Fifth Doctor, Rachel.

Scene 24. Another hotel room. Llyod, Rachel. Roy. Llyod dies.

Scene 25. A shelter. Rachel, Sixth Doctor and two derelicts in front of the television.

Scene 26. TV studio. Host, Helen. Sixth Doctor. Rachel. Man. Shot.

Scene 27. Sixth Doctor. Rachel.

Transition (how?). Rachel becomes a doctor (!?).

Scene 28. An office. Rachel, Woman Patient. Tom Jr.

Epilogue. (Only now we understand that everything was in her mind?) THE ENDING IS MISSING!!

When and how do we transit from the Movie Production to her nightmare? and what's the end?

[ Brecht, episodic structure ]

Next: shows.vtheatre.net
RECKLESS:   NORMAN RENE (Director)   Bio
   
   "RECKLESS is a comedy, and I think the movie is an odyssey    a
   woman's journey through America. For me the design of the movie
   reflects Rachel's view of the world, and her view of the world to me
   is very post war America    in the sense that we're not willing to
   look at the bad things in the world, and that's really what Rachel's
   dilemma is. She's not willing to look at the negative things that
   happen, and she keeps roaming America until she finally learns the
   lesson she needed to learn: the moral of the story is that if you
   don't look at the things that are bad, then those things will
   eventually destroy you.
   
   Christmas is used in the story because in America it's often a
   difficult time for people since it's a time of great expectations.
   People are expected to be happy. They're expected to be close to their
   families. They're expected to be safe, and they don't always feel that
   way. I think it makes them feel bad that they don't fit the mold. Even
   on this particular day they become depressed because everything is not
   so perfect or not perfect enough. That's sort of what the movie is
   about, that life is reckless with people and we have to face the good
   and the bad, not just pretend everything is a beautiful Christmas
   tree.
   
   We spent a lot of time defining the world in which this story could
   take place, and seem acceptable and real to an audience on its own
   terms. Andy Jackness, Fred Elmes and I spent a lot of time looking at
   photographs and talking about each set and how the story moves and
   changes    how the realities change. What was more real or less real.
   By building everything, we could control the look and feeling of this
   world.
   
   Lloyd and Pooty, like Rachel and many characters in this film, are
   running from their past, and none of them is able to succeed in doing
   that. They represent, for Rachel, the perfect parents, the perfect
   family. They all build a life together, but it is built on avoiding
   their past and running from the truth of who they are rather than
   dealing with that. That's why it all crumbles and falls apart. They
   are good people who are trying to rebuild their lives, which is the
   good part of what they are doing. They just forgot to deal with the
   things they did last."

     _________________________________________________________________
   NORMAN RENE has maintained a longtime creative collaboration with
   writer Craig Lucas, having directed BLUE WINDOW for PBS' American
   Playhouse; LONGTIME COMPANION, which received the Audience Award at
   the Sundance Film Festival and garnered an Oscar Nomination for Bruce
   Davison; and PRELUDE TO A KISS with Meg Ryan and Alec Baldwin.
   
   A prolific stage director, he directed the Broadway productions of Mr.
   Lucas' "Prelude To A Kiss" and George Furth's "Precious Sons" with Ed
   Harris and Judith Ivey. He has received the Obie Award, L.A. Drama
   Critics Award, the Drama Logue Award and a Drama Desk Nomination.
      Comments to: beckett@netcom.com

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